Category Archives: Workers Compensation

Medicare Secondary Payer Set-Asides and Conditional Payments in New York Workers’ Compensation Cases

Attorney Declan Gourley leads a presentation designed to help the attendee answer the following questions: “Can I settle this case?” and “Does Medicare have a current interest I need to consider?” and “Do I need to consider Medicare’s future interest?” Presenter Declan Gourley has years of experience representing claimants before the Social Security law judges and employers and carriers before the Workers’ Compensation Board. At the end of the presentation, the attendees will have a basic understanding of Medicare Secondary Payer exposure and when they need to consider Medicare’s interest in a lump-sum settlement.

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Video: New Schedule Loss of Use Guidelines in New York

LOIS Partner Christian Sison leads a presentation on the new-for-2018 New York Guidelines for Determining Impairment. The new Guidelines replace the prior methods of determining Scheduled Loss of Use for all claims where an impairment report was not submitted before January 1, 2018 and will have an impact on exposure join all future claims. Attorney Sison provides examples including side-by-side exposure analysis of the same impairment under the old and new Guidelines and answers questions live from the webinar audience.

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Training on 2018 New York Impairment Guidelines

2018 Impairment GuidelinesThe Board has adopted New Guidelines for Determining Impairment. These are the same Guidelines which were proposed in November 2017. The new Guidelines replace the prior methods of determining Scheduled Loss of Use for all claims where an impairment report was not submitted before January 1, 2018. For cases where an impairment rating report was submitted before January 1, 2018, the 2012 Guidelines will apply. The new Guidelines are here.

Training on the New Guidelines.

We will be running training on the new Guidelines, led by LOIS partner Christian Sison, on January 8, 2017 in multiple sessions. Register here:
Register for 12PM EST January 8 – New Guidelines Training
Register for 3PM EST January 8 – New Guidelines Training

Both webinars are LIVE and Questions-and-Answer sessions will be held.

Video: Section 29 Reimbursement, Lien recovery, and Subrogation in New York

Attorneys Christopher Major and Glenn Johnston lead a presentation on Section 29 reimbursement and subrogation in New York workers’ compensation claims. The attorneys discuss reimbursement to the carrier/employer from the proceeds of civil actions as well as tactics for maximizing recovery – including negotiation tips for dealing with plaintiff’s attorneys who always demand a lien reduction to “1/3rd.”

Subject: New York, Workers’ Compensation Law, LWEC, Permanency, Exposure
Date Presented: December 18, 2017
Presenter(s): Christopher Major and Glenn Johnston
Run time: 22:51


Continue reading Video: Section 29 Reimbursement, Lien recovery, and Subrogation in New York

Court Reviews Evidence to Support a Finding that the Petitioner was deemed Permanently and Totally Disabled due Solely to the Last Compensable Accident

Karen Vincent, Esq.
Karen Vincent, Esq.

On October 30, 2017, the Appellate Division of the Superior Court of New Jersey in D’Angelo v. Archdiocese of Newark, N.J. Super. App. Div. (per curiam) (22pp.) issued a written decision affirming a prior compensation judge’s ruling that the petitioner was permanently and totally disabled from the last accident.

The petitioner, Teresa D’Angelo, was employed as a school bus driver for the respondent, Archdiocese of Newark/Christ the King Preparatory Schools at the time of the accident. On November 28, 2011, while driving the school bus, she was hit by a stray bullet from an AK-47. The bullet lodged in to petitioner’s pelvis causing multiple internal injuries. The respondent accepted compensability of the claim and authorized the petitioner to submit to treatment. Petitioner underwent authorized surgery and treatment to the pelvis, hips, abdomen, lumbar spine and PTSD. Continue reading Court Reviews Evidence to Support a Finding that the Petitioner was deemed Permanently and Totally Disabled due Solely to the Last Compensable Accident

Can an Incapacitated New Jersey Beneficiary Receive Dependency Benefits for Life?

Michael Gervolino, Esq.
Michael Gervolino, Esq.
The New Jersey Workers Compensation Act specifies that in the case of total disability, the petitioner is entitled to payments for a period of up until 450 weeks. See N.J.S.A. 34:15-12(b). If the petitioner perishes as a result of his workers compensation injury, the Act provides us with guidance for the petitioner’s dependents at the time of death. For example, in the case of a surviving spouse, the Act directs us to N.J.S.A. 34:15-13(j), which states that the surviving spouse shall receive payments for the “entire period of survivorship or until such surviving spouse shall remarry.” See N.J.S.A. 34:15-13(j).

In the case of children as dependents, the plain language of N.J.S.A. 34:15-13 tells us that us that they are entitled to payments up until the age of 18, unless they are physically or mentally deficient which would allow them to collect on the “full compensation period of 450 weeks.” See N.J.S.A. 34:15-13(i). The plain meaning of this statue leads one to interpret the language as limiting disabled dependents to 450 weeks of compensation following the death of the petitioner, unless they are a surviving spouse.

In the case of Apperman v. Visiting Nurse Ass’n of Westfield, a father and son challenged this interpretation of the statute by arguing that a disabled dependent is entitled to benefits for the entirety of his life. Continue reading Can an Incapacitated New Jersey Beneficiary Receive Dependency Benefits for Life?